baby at birth

Beyond Concussion: Head Injuries at Birth

The unexpected head injury — birth

As we explore head injuries this month it is easy to overlook events from our very entry into this world.

There are so many ways that a baby’s head gets stressed at birth. Yes, there is supposed to be lots of stress at birth. However, in a number of birth scenarios there is an inordinate level of stress. Some of the birth scenarios include when the head positioning is oriented wrong, baby is breech or sunnyside-up, has torticolis or has a wrapped umbilical cord. Read more

tummy time

Visual-Motor System Need an Upgrade, or Just an Update?

Shoulder and head strength, hand-eye coordination, hand function, and more — so many essential postural and motor skills emanate from tummy time!

What may not be so apparent? The same fundamental laddered skills related to tummy time support our visual-motor function and are needed at every age. Read more

visual motor development

Trouble with Fine Motor Skills? Why Tummy Time is So Important

Do you or your child need better focus and/or fine motor skills?

In his 2008 book, Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell introduced us to the concept of 10,000 hours for mastery. Motor skill development is no different, yet we find so many reasons why infants and young children have missed out on the hours and hours necessary to set them up for success in school. Read more

when is a reach more than a reach

Children’s Motor Skills: When is a Reach more than a Reach?

Early life events are a big deal!

Motor skills are actually an essential aspect for all that we hope our children will be — thriving socially and emotionally.

Every sensory-motor skill developed as an infant is essential for building another skill somewhere down the road. This concept is called laddering — the skills ladder on top of each other. Read more

impact of medical procedures

The Hidden Impact of Medical Procedures on Children

Beyond the Scar

A recent newsletter discussed the considerations of pre- and post-surgical considerations which often leave a lasting imprint of pain, discomfort, and insomnia. When procedures are for a child there is more to consider.

The impact of medical procedures upon a child’s development is personal — my son had 38 lumbar punctures and four surgical procedures during his three years of leukemia treatment. The biggest impacts, which doctors had no answers for, were in the cognitive, emotional, and social domains. I was left to figure it out on my own. Nine years later he is now thriving.  Read more